Department of Computer Science

HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Computer Science at the University of Jos has a history going back to 2001, when Computer Science programme was introduced in the Department of Mathematics during the 2001/2002 academic session. As the subject grew in importance, the Department of Computer Science was established during the 2012/2013 Academic Session after due approval by both the Senate of the University of Jos and the National Universities Commission (NUC) to provide a focus for continued development within the University.  At its inception, Prof. T. Ishaya was appointed as the pioneer Head of Department (2012 – 2016).  Thereafter, Prof. Choji Davou Nyap was elected to take over (2016 – date).The Department of Computer Science is one the youngest in the Faculty of Natural Sciences.

Before the establishment of the departmentthe Computer Science BSc programme was managed in the Department of Mathematics, which started as an offshoot of the parent Department of Mathematics at the University of Ibadan in 1974.  During the 1975/76 session, Prof. S.A. Messiha was appointed as a Coordinator of the young department.  The Department of Mathematics has very distinguished Professors and staff that have played key roles in the University of Jos and in the Nigerian University System.  Professor E. N. Chukwu, the first Nigerian Head of Department was appointed the First Vice Chancellor of the University of Technology, Yola in 1980.   Dr. G.M. Habibullah who took over from Professor Chukwu as the Head of Department is the Vice Chancellor at the University of Education, Lahore, Pakistan (2007). Professor L.S.O. Liverpool apart from been HOD at one time served as Director of Academic Planning, University ICT Coordinator and played a key role in the development of the first strategic plan of the University.  He has given services to the Jos Carnegie Partnership, the National Universities Commission, the National Teachers Institute and the ICT forum of Partnership Institutions. Professor P. Onumanyi was also Dean, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic), University of Jos and President, Mathematical Association of Nigeria before he left the services of the University to the position of Deputy Director-General in the National Mathematical Centre, Abuja. Professor M.S. Auduapart from been HOD served as the Director of Academic Planning and was the Dean of the Faculty of Natural Sciences before he was appointed as the Vice Chancellor of the Federal University of Technology, Minna in 2007. Professor S.U. Momoh, Professor U. W.  Sirisena andProf. J P Chollom served as the Heads of Department. Prof. S. E. Adewumiwho was the last HOD when the program was under Maths Department from 2011-2012 was also the Chapter Chairman for Nigerian Computer Society, Plateau State Chapter from 2005 up till 2012 when he moved to Federal Universty Lokoja and is presently the Dean of Science Federal University, Lokoja.

 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science provides the skill sets required of the IT software and hardware engineering, with enough flexibility to include a range of Science electives from the wide range of courses in the Faculty of Natural Sciences of the University. The core courses consist of academics as well as industry teaching areas.

The course is designed to produce qualitative software/system engineers and academics that the country so needs in this time. The programme provides a coherent, sequential and integrated academic programme of in-depth study that furnishes a body of knowledge and methods as well as practice in the area of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). The curriculum focuses on the problem-solving skills and techniques needed to provide computer-based solutions to practical problems; including fundamental practical knowledge in the fields of software engineering, relational databases, programming languages, operating systems, computer networking, distributed systems and computer security. The programme will prepare students for graduate studies in Computer Science.

Objectives of the Programme

The objectives of the bachelors honours degree programme in Computer Science are:

  1. To create in students the awareness of and enthusiasm for computer science and its capabilities.
  2. To involve the students in an intellectually stimulating and satisfying experience of learning and studying
  3. To provide a broad and balanced foundation in computer science knowledge and practical skills.
  4. To develop in students through an education in computer science a range of transferable applicable skills of information technology to all aspects of human endeavours.
  5. To generate in students an appreciation of the importance of computer in an industrial, economic, technological and social context.
  6. To provide students with knowledge and skills base for further studies in computer science or multi-disciplinary studies involving computer science.

Research

The fields of research in the department includeComputer Science Theory/Foundation of Computer Science, Computer Systems Architecture, Software Engineering, Database Systems/Data Engineering, Computer Communications and Networks, Artificial Intelligence, Computer Forensics and Human Computer Interactions

Learning Areas / Learning outcome

All bachelor honours degree students in Computer Science are expected to develop the following abilities and skills:

  1. Regime of Subject Knowledge Conversances with the core areas of computer science
  2. Competencies and Skills Cognitive abilities and skills relating to solution of problems in computing as well as practical skills relating to the conduct of the computing field
  3. Behavioral Attitudes General skills relating to non-subject specific competencies, communication, General Studies (GST) knowledge, interpersonal, organization skills and ethical standards. 

Course Duration: 

Each student has a minimum of four years (eight semesters) and a maximum of six years (twelve semesters) to graduate.

CareerOpportunities

Graduates from the department have gone on to many different careers, whether working forcompanies, parastatals or academia. One may go on to apply their knowledge directly as a computer scientist or apply one’s IT skills and problem-solving abilities in a related field such as finance, marketing or general business.

  

To ensure proper coordination of all activities in the department, the following responsibilities are spearheaded thus;

  1. Head of Department                                           Prof. D. N. Choji
  2. Departmental SIWES coordinator                      Dr. G. Thomas
  3. Departmental Examination officer                     Dr. N. V. Blamah
  4. Registration/Time-table Officer                         Mr. O. D. Oyerinde
  5. Project Coordinator and screening Officer        Dr. G. D. Bibu

Student Academic Counseling

This is typically done by the level coordinator and often relates to registration of courses. Attention of students is at times drawn to the various regulations governing academic matters and examination which is contained in the academic programme published by the university.

Level coordinators

  1. 100 Level                                Dr. M. J. Sule
  2. 200 Level                                Dr. N. Gurumdimma
  3. 300 Level                                Dr. G. D. Bibu
  4. 400 Level                                Mr. O. D. Oyerinde
  5. Continuing I                            Mrs. E. Onokpasa
  6. Continuing II                           Ms. D. D. Datiri

 

  • UME:   Five O/L Credit passes to include English Language, Mathematics, Physics plus two other science subjects.  Economics and Geography are not accepted.
  • DE: In addition to UME requirements, two A/L passes (Graded A-E) in the relevant subjects (Mathematics, Computer Science, Chemistry and Physics. The University accepts its own Diploma/other recognized University Diploma in Computer Science with a minimum of Upper Credit. 

Distinctive programme requirements

Students studying computer science are required to have their own laptops to enhance their practical work.

Registration Guidelines

All prospective students of the University must go through the registration process by completing relevant documents. Registration of the fresh students will begin at the Admissions’ office of the university and end in the Computer Science department

All returning students of the Computer Science department are required to register for the prescribed courses for the academic session. Students are expected to complete the registration process within a period of two weeks from the commencement of the first semester of each session. Late registration attracts a fee which is subject to review.

To successfully complete the registration process, the student needs to do the following:

  1. Pay fees at designated bank, acquire a teller to present at bursary, who will then issue the student the University Bursary receipt
  2. Present their fee clearance at the faculty for collection of a set of registration materials
  3. Complete all forms, including going to the Department of General Studies
After completion of all forms with assistance of level coordinator where necessary, a copy is to be submitted to the Level coordinator.

4-Year Programme

 

THROUGH UME

CORE EDUCATION COURSES

EDUCATION OPTIONAL ELECTIVE

PREREQUISITE SUBJECT AREAS

SUBJECT AREA ELECTIVES

GST COURSES

TOTAL

MIN – MAX

100 LEVEL

    10

 

 

   2

 

     4

 

30 - 48

200 LEVEL

   11

 

 

   6

 

   3

 

    2

 

30 - 48

300 LEVEL

  10

 

 

   10

 

   4

 

 

30 - 48

400 LEVEL

   9

 

 

   13

 

   9

 

 

30 - 48

TOTAL

 

  40

 

 

  29

 

  18

 

   6

 

120 - 192

 

3-Year Programme

 

THROUGH UME

CORE EDUCATION COURSES

EDUCATION OPTIONAL ELECTIVE

PRESEQUISITE SUBJECT AREAS

SUBJECT AREA ELECTIVES

GST COURSES

TOTAL

MIN -

MAX

200 LEVEL

   11

 

 

   6

 

   3

 

6

 

30 - 48

300 LEVEL

  10

 

 

   10

 

   4

 

 

30 - 48

400 LEVEL

   9

 

 

   13

 

   9

 

 

30 - 48

TOTAL

 

  30

 

 

  29

 

  16

 

6

 

90 -144

Continuous Assessment

Continuous Assessment (CA) is a method of periodic assessment for students so as to reduce over-dependence on end-of-course examinations.  It normally contributes up to a maximum of 40% of the total course mark for each course. Continuous Assessment is by means of term papers, frequent tests assessment in laboratory assignments etc.

Pass Mark

A Pass in a course is obtained by scoring at least the minimum course mark of 45%. A Pass in practical work is obtained by satisfying the conditions as prescribed in the course.

           

 

For a student to graduate from a B.Sc Computer Science Programme, he/she needs to earn a minimum of 120 credit units for a4-year B.Sc Computer Science Programme and a minimum of 90 credit units for a 3-year B.Sc Computer Science Programme.

 

SEMESTER EXAMINATION GUIDELINES

Considering that the University of Jos has adopted the Course system, examinations are administered at the end of each course, which is usually at the end of the semester.

Eligibility

In order to be eligible for any exam in the department, the student must have;

  1. Registered for the course
  2. Fulfilled the University’s requirements concerning fees or other related matters
  3. An attendance of at least 75% in class
  4. Fulfilled the Department’s requirements regarding satisfactory completion of coursework or other related matters

Conduct of Examination in the University

  1. A student may be admitted up to 30 minutes after commencement of exams but shall not be allowed extra time. On no account shall the student be allowed to leave the exam venue during the first hour or the last twenty minutes. A student must submit his/her script to the invigilator before leaving the examination hall if he/she does not intend to return
  2. A student who leaves the examination hall shall not be allowed back in, unless, during the period of absence, he/she was continually under the supervision of an invigilator
  3. All students should come along with their I. D. card and course registration form before admittance into the hall, once in the hall, these articles should be displayed conspicuously
  4. No unauthorized materials shall be carried into the examination hall by students. A student should not directly or indirectly give another student any form of assistance.
  5. All candidates are to sign an attendance register
  6. Timetable for all examinations will be placed on the notice board
  7. Any student who absents their self from an examination without formal permission shall be awarded an E (Fail)

Grade Point Average (GPA)

  1. A grading system using both letter (A-E) and figure (0-4) is more consistent with the system of degree classification in use in Nigeria, and, is therefore approved for adoption.
  2. A minimum pass mark of 45% (equivalent to grade point of 1) is approved for uniform adoption.  Also, a minimum CGPA of 2 is required for graduation.
  3. The percentage score, letter grades, grade point average (GPA), cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and classes of degree, as approved for adoption are as shown in the table that follows:

 

(i)

Credit Units

(ii)

%

Scores

(iii)

Letter

Grades

(iv)

Grade Points (GP)

(v)

Grade Point average (GPA)

(vi)

Cumulative

Average (CGPA)

(vii)

Class of Degree

Vary according to

contact hours assigned to each course per week

per semester and

according to work load

carried  by student

70-100

A

4

Derived by

multiplying

I and IV

and dividing

by total

credit units

3.50-4.00

First Class

60-69

B

3

3.00-3.49

2nd Class Upper

50-59

C

2

2.00-2.99

2nd Class Lower

45-49

D

1

1.00-1.99

Third Class

0-44

E

0

0.00-0.99

Fail

 

 

 

 

 

 

Definition of Grade Point Grade Point Average and Cumulative Grade Point Average

As there is considerable variation in the modes of application and interpretation of Grade Point Average (GPA) and Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) as a means of computing mean score of a student, therefore, the need to define and streamline their use as follows:

  1. Grade Point (GP)

The Grade Point derives from the actual percentage, raw score for a given course; the raw score is converted into a letter grade and a grade point

  1. Grade Point Average (GPA)

Performance in any semester is reported in Grade Point average.  This is average of weighted grade points earned in the courses taken during the semester.  The Grade Point Average is obtained by multiplying the Grade Point attained in each course by the number of Credit units assigned to that course, and then summing these up and dividing by the total number of Credit Units taken for the semester.

  1. Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)

This is the up-to-date mean of the Grade Points earned by the student in a programme of study.  It is an indication of the student’s overall performance at any point in the training programme.  To compute the Cumulative grade point average, the total of Grade Points multiplied by the respective Credit Units for all the semesters are added and then divided by the total number of Credit Units for all courses registered by the student.

REGULATION GOVERNING RESULT OUTCOMES

Once results are out, students may have a few issues that require actions. The following is a guide to be implemented where necessary:

Appeal for Reassessment of Examination scripts

A student may request for reassessment of the quality of his/her work in a course examination during the semester and within two weeks after publication of results. When this application is made, the student needs to pay a reassessment fee and reassessment will only surface after a presentation of evidence of payment. The fee is refundable only if the appeal is unsuccessful. The appeal is final after Senate approval

Probation

This is a status referring to a student whose academic performance at the end of a particular year has a CGPA less than 1.00. The probation duration is for one academic session

Withdrawal

A case of withdrawal may arise in the following situations:

  1. Withdrawn from Programme: A student with a CGPA less than 1.00 at the end of the probation period would be withdrawn from programme
  2. Withdrawn from University: A student with a CGPA less than 1.00 at the end of two consecutive academic  sessions will be withdrawn from the institution
  3. Voluntary Withdrawal: A student would be considered to have voluntarily withdrawn if he/she absents his/her self from all courses without any formal notification to the department of a desire to defer the session or semester for an academic session.

Repeating Failed Course Unit(s)

Subject to the condition of probation and withdrawal, students are allowed to repeat failed course unit(s) at the next available opportunity. The failed courses are registered before registering of fresh courses for the semester.

List of courses

IOO LEVEL CORE COURSES

CODE

TITLE

UNIT

SEMESTER

PRE-REQUISITE

CSC 101

Introduction to Computer Science

2

1

 

CSC 102

Introduction to Computer Applications

3

2

 

MTH 101

Elementary Mathematics I

3

1

 

MTH 102

Elementary Mathematics II

3

2

 

MTH 103

Elementary Mathematics III

3

2

 

STA 203

Statistics for Physical Sciences and Engineering

4

2

 

BIO 101

General Biology I

4

1

 

CHM 101

Physical Chemistry I

3

1

 

CHM 103

Practical Physical Chemistry

1

1

 

PHY 102

General Physics II

3

2

 

GST 101

Use of English

4

2

 

GST 102

Philosophy and Logic

2

2

 

GST 103

Nigerian People and Culture

2

1

 

GST 104

History and Philosophy of Science

2

1

 

                           TOTAL

39

 

 

ELECTIVES COURSES

STA 111

Probability I

4

1

 

PHY 101

General Physics I

3

1

 

2OO LEVEL CORE COURSES

CODE

TITLE

UNIT

SEMESTER

PRE-REQUISITE

CSC 201

Computer Programming I

4

1

CSC 101

CSC 202

Computer Programming II

3

2

CSC 101

CSC 203

Introduction to Computer Systems

2

2

CSC 101

CSC 204

Introduction to File Processing

2

1

CSC 101

CSC 205

Computer Hardware

3

2

 

MTH 202

Elementary Differential Equations I

3

1

MTH 103

MTH 203

Sets, Logic and Algebra

3

1

MTH 101

MTH 204

Linear Algebra I

2

1

MTH 101

MTH 205

Linear Algebra II

2

2

MTH 101

MTH 209

Introduction to Numerical Analysis

3

1

MTH 101 & MTH 103

PHY 202

Electrical Circuits and Electronics

3

1

 

GST 222

Peace and Conflict Studies

2

2

 

GST 223

Introduction to Entrepreneurial Skill

2

1

 

                        TOTAL

34

 

 

ELECTIVES

MTH 201

Mathematical Methods I

3

1

MTH 103

PHY 241

Electromagnetism

3

2

PHY102

STA 211

Probability II

4

1

STA 111/ STA 203

300 LEVEL CORE COURSES

CODE

TITLE

UNIT

SEMESTER

PRE-REQUISITE

CSC 301

Introduction to Digital Design and Microprocessors

4

1

CSC 203 & PHY 202

CSC 302

Operating Systems

3

1

CSC 203

CSC 303

Computer Architecture

3

1

CSC 203

CSC 304

Compiler Construction

3

1

CSC 201 & CSC 203

CSC 305

Data Structure And Algorithms

4

1

CSC 204

CSC 306

System Analysis and Design

3

1

CSC 101

CSC 307

Database Design and Management

4

1

CSC 204

CSC 318

SIWES

6

2

 

MTH 309

Discrete Mathematics

4

1

MTH 203 & MTH 204

MTH 318

Numerical Analysis I

3

1

MTH 209

                          TOTAL

37

 

 

ELECTIVE COURSES

CSC 309

Object –Oriented Programming

3

1

CSC 202

CSC 311

Automata Theory, Computability And Formal Languages

3

1

CSC 202

MTH 316

Introduction To Operations Research

3

1

MTH 204 & MTH 205

CSC 311

Automata Theory, Computability and Formal Languages

3

1

CSC 202

4OO LEVEL CORE COURSES

CODE

TITLE

UNIT

SEMESTER

PRE-REQUISITE

CSC 401

Organization of Programming Languages

3

2

CSC 303

CSC 402

System Modelling and Simulation

3

2

CSC 301

CSC 403

Design and Analysis of Algorithms

3

2

CSC 305

CSC 404

Fundamentals of Software Engineering

3

2

CSC 306

CSC 406

Computer Graphics

3

1

CSC 101

CSC 407

Computer Systems Performance Evaluation

2

1

CSC 101

CSC 409

Data Communications and Networks

3

1

CSC 301

CSC 410

I.T. Research Methodology and Project Management

3

1

CSC 306

CSC 414

PROJECT

6

1 & 2

 

                         TOTAL

29

 

 

ELECTIVE COURSES

CSC 405

Queuing Systems

2

1

MTH 316

CSC 408

Artificial Intelligence

2

2

 

CSC 411

Compiler Construction II

2

1

CSC 304

CSC 412

Structured Programming

2

1

CSC 201 & CSC 202

CSC 415

Net-Centric Computing

3

2

CSC 202 & CSC 309

CSC 417

Distributed Computing Systems

3

1

CSC 204 & CSC 303

CSC 418

Special Topics in Computer Science

3

2

 

CSC 416

Human Computer Interaction

3

1

 

MTH 427

Numerical Analysis II

3

2

MTH 318

Course Description

100 Level

 

CSC 101 – Introduction to Computer Science (3   Units)

(L. 45: P.0: T.0) Pre-requisite: Credit in O/L Maths or its Equivalent.

History of Computer Science and their generation.Computer Hardware; functional components, characteristics of computers and their relationships, Modern I/O units. Software: Operating systems, application packages. Program: Development; flow charts and algorithms; program objects. BASIC or VISUAL BASIC Fundamentals

 

CSC 102 – Introduction to Computer Applications(3 Units)

(L. 30: P.15: T.0) Pre-requisite: Pre-requisite: Credit in O/L Maths or its Equivalent.

Problem solving strategies, Role of algorithms in problem solving process, implementation strategies, concepts and properties of algorithms.Overview of programming languages (Machine language, Assembly language, High level language).Program interpretation and execution (Translation and compilation processes).Fundamental programming constructs; Basic syntax and semantic of a high level language; variables, data type and assignment; simple I/O; conditional and iterative structures; functions, subroutines and parameter passing; recursion; structured decomposition. String processing, internal searching and sorting. A simple high level programming language will be used in teaching the course.

 

200 Level

 

CSC 201- Computer Programming I (4 Units)

(L. 30: P.15: T. 0.)Pre-requisite: CS 101

Introduction to problem solving methods and algorithm development; designing, coding, debugging and documenting programs using techniques of a good programming language style; computer organization; programming language and programming algorithm development. A widely used programming language will be used in teaching the above.

 

CSC 202-Computer Programming II (3 Units)

(L. 30: P.15: T. 0)Pre-requisite: CS 101

Introduction to object-oriented  programming. Programs decomposition into classes and objects.Inheritance, exceptions, interface, design by contract, basic design patterns, and reuse. Design, implement and debug object-oriented programs composed of multiple classes and over a variety of data structures. An overview of the issues involved in the design and implementation of graphical user interfaces, database access and windows applications. An object-oriented language such as Visual Basic. Net, C++, Java will be used in teaching this course.

 

CSC 203- Introduction to Computer Systems (2 Units)

(L. 30: P.0: T. 0.)Pre-requisite: CS 101

Computer structure, functions of assemblers, linkers and loaders, representation of numbers in computers, basic assembly language instruction sets, addressing modes, stacks and procedures, low level I/O, concepts and examples of microprogramming, and logic circuits. Students will be expected to design, implement and debug programs in an assembly language. Any available assembler should be used in teaching the course.

 

CSC 204-Introduction to File Processing (2 Units)

(L. 45: P.0: T. 0)Pre-requisite: CS 102

Introduction to data management files and job-control, languages application. An overview of I/O (input/output) system architecture; logical file organisations, mapping logical organisation onto physical storages; Back-up procedure, file recovery, Higher level language data management facilities.

 

CSC 205 Computer Hardware (3 Units)

(L:45 P:0)

Computer circuits; diode arrays, PIAs etc, Integrated circuits fabrication process. Use of MSI, LSI and VLSI IC’ hardware Design. Primary and Secondary memories; core memory, etc. Magnetic devices; disks, tapes, video disks etc. Peripheral devices; printers, CRT’s, keyboards, character recognition. Operational amplifiers; Analogue-to- digital and Digital-to-analogue converter. Analogue computers.

 

300 Level

 

CSC 301-Introduction to Digital Design and Microprocessor(4 Units)

(L. 45: P.0: T. 0)Pre-requisite: CS 203 & PHY 202

Logic components, Boolean algebra, DeMorgans’s Theorem, Karnaugh Maps, combinational logic analysis and synthesis (SOP, POS), synchronous and asynchronous sequential logic analysis and design, digital subsystems (adders, subtractors, encoders , decoders, multiplexers, demultiplexers, etc), computer organization and design. Integration of combinational and sequential circuits in the microprocessor architecture involving these circuits.

 

CSC 302-Operating Systems (3 Units)

(L. 30: P.15: T. 0) Pre-requisite: CS 204

Basic operating system concepts and services; interrupt processing, process and thread management, concurrency, deadlock, resource scheduling and synchronization, system structure; resource management; real and virtual memory management, input/output systems, disk scheduling and file systems structure and implementation, secondary and tertiary storage structure; protection and security; design and construction of concurrent programs. Multi-programming and Multi-processing systems . Case studies of historical and modern operating systems.

 

CSC 303-Computer Architecture (3 Units)

(L. 45: P.0: T. 15) Pre-requisite: CS 203

Exploration of modern computer architectures in terms of instruction sets and organization of processors, controllers, memories, devices, and communication links. Overview of computer systems, theoretical foundations, modern computer systems components, pipelining of instruction sets, malfunction pipelines, parallel computer organization. Memory addressing, memory hierarchy, virtual memory control systems, hardware control, microprogrammed control, asynchronous control, I/O control. Introduction to the methodology of fault-tolerant computing.

 

CSC 304-Compiler Construction(3 Units)

(L. 45: P.0: T. 0) Pre-requisite: CS 201 & CS 203

Review of compilers, assemblers and interpreters; structure and functional aspects of a typical compiler; syntax, semantics and pragmatics; functional relationship between lexical analysis, syntax analysis, expression analysis and code generation. Error detection and recovery. The parsing problem, the scanner. Grammars and languages; recognizers, top-down and bottom-up; production language; run-time storage organization. Construction of LR table, Organization of symbol tables. Allocation to run-time variables. Code generation, optimization and translator writing systems.

 

CSC 305- Data Structure and Algorithms (4 Units)

(L. 60: P.0: T. O) Pre-requisite: CS 204

Bits, bytes, words linear structures and list structures, arrays, tree structures, sets and relations, higher-level language data types and data-handling facilities.

 

CSC 306- System Analysis and Design (3 Units)

(L. 30: P.15: T. 0) Pre-requisite: CS101

An overview of systems development methodologies will be presented in addition to concepts of system analysis and design, the students will be exposed to concept in project management (Phases of project life cycle, tools and techniques for planning –PERT and CPM, the role of teamwork and communication), and information gathering techniques, introduction to object oriented analysis and design using Unified Modelling Language (UML). Students will also learn to use a CASE tool to document the analysis and design deliverables.

 

CSC 307- Data-Base Design and Management (4 Units)

(L. 30: P.15: T. 0.)Pre-requisite: CS204

The design, use and application of database management systems. Topics include the relational data model, relational query languages, design theory, and conceptual data design and modelling for relational database design. Hierarchical and network data models. File organisation, query processing, concurrency control, roll back and recovery, integrity and consistency, and view implementation. Techniques that provide for data independence and minimal redundancy will be discussed. Students will be expected to design and implement database system applications.

 

CSC 309- Object-Oriented Programming (3 Units)

(L. 45: P. 0: T. 0) Pre-requisite: CS 202 & CS 309

Basic OOP Concepts; Classes, Objects, inheritance, polymorphism, Data Abstraction, Tool for developing, Compiling, interpreting and debugging OO programs, Java Programming, Java Syntax and data objects, operators, Central flow constructs, objects and classes, programming, Arrays, methods. Exceptions, Java Servlets, Window Toolkit, exercises.

 

CSC 318-Students Industrial Work Experience Scheme( 6 Units)

Industrial attachment in different sectors, be it companies, parastatals, IT firms, research establishments or applying one’s IT skills and problem-solving abilities in a related field such as finance, marketing or general business . This incorporates six months of supervised industrial attachment. The SIWES shall take place in the 2nd semester of the third year. The department in conjunction with the University Directorate of SIWES shall arrange to place students in relevant sectors.

The students shall be supervised and assessed by both industry-based and institution – based supervisors. In such evaluations, special interest should be taken of the following;

        1. Punctuality
        2. Attendance
        3. General attitude to work
        4. Respect for Authority
        5. Interest in the field and technical area

 

400 Level

 

CSC 401 – Organisation of Programming Languages (3 Units)

(L. 30: P.15: T.0) Pre-requisite: CS 303

A study of programming language principles and paradigms.Formal syntax, including grammars, and semantics.paradigms including imperative, object-oriented, functional, logic, event-driven and concurrent.Run-time implementation issues, including memory management and garbage collection, parameter passing and event handling.Type checking and type inference.

 

CSC 402- Systems Modelling and Simulation (3 Units)

(L. 45: P. 0: T. 0) Pre-requisite: CS 301

An introduction to basic tools and applications for modelling and analysis of computer systems. Fundamentals of network flow graphs, graph models of computation and stochastic models of computer systems performance. Network delay analysis and capacity planning, reachability analysis for deadlock detection in distributed systems, Markov chains, elementary queuing theory, basic concepts of queuing network models and associated analyses. Introduction to simulation. Discrete and continuous stochastic models, random number generation, elementary statistics, simulation of queuing and inventory systems, discrete event simulation, point and interval parameter estimation.

 

CSC 403- Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3 Units)

(L. 45: P. 0: T. 0) Pre-requisite: CS 305

A systematic study of algorithms and their complexity, including searching, sorting , selecting and algorithms for graphs. A survey of algorithm design methods, including greedy algorithms, divide- and –conquer, dynamic programming, and back-tracking. An introduction to NP-complete problems. Students will be expected to write and analyze programs.

 

CSC 404- Fundamentals of Software Engineering (3 Units)

(L. 30: P.15: T. 0) Pre-requisite: CS 306

Introduction to the fundamental principles of software engineering. Modern software development techniques and life cycle are emphasized. Topics include requirement engineering, formal specification and validation, analysis and design, architecture, implementation, testing and quality, configuration management, and project management. Cost estimation models. Issues in software quality assurance and software maintenance. Students will be expected to complete a project that employs techniques from the topics studied.

 

CSC 405- Queuing Systems (2 Units)

(L. 30: P. 0: T. 0) Pre-requisite: MTH 316

Introduction; birth-death queuing system; Markovian queues, the queue I-GI bounds, inequalities and approximation.

 

CSC 406-Computer Graphics (3 Units)

(L. 30: P.15: T. 0) Pre-requisite: CS 101

Introduction to computer graphics and its applications. Topics include coordinate systems, the relationship between continuous objects and discrete displays, fill and flood algorithms, two-dimensional geometric transformations, clipping, zooming, panning and windowing. Topics from three-dimensional graphics include representation for objects, geometric and projection transformations, geometric modelling, and hidden line/surface removal algorithms. Warnock’s method, shading, data reduction for graphical input.Introduction to handwriting and character recognition. Curve synthesis and fitting. Contouring. Ring structures versus doubly linked lists.

 

CSC 407-Computer Systems Performance Evaluation (2 Units)

(L. 30: P. 0: T. 0) Pre-requisite: CS101

Statistical techniques of computer system performance evaluation and measurement.System selection and tuning strategies.Deterministic and probabilistic models of process scheduling and resource allocation.Systematic study of system architectures.

 

CSC 408- Artificial Intelligence(2 Units)

(L. 30: P. 0: T. 0) Pre-requisite:

Introduction to artificial intelligence; principles of knowledge-based search techniques; automatic deduction, knowledge representation using predicate logic, machine learning, probabilistic reasoning, objects, frames, rules. Application in tasks such as problem-solving, data mining, game playing, natural language understanding, computer vision, speech recognition and robotics. Symbolic computation: Lisp or Prolog programming.

 

CSC 409- Data Communication and Networks (3 Units)

(L. 30: P. 15: T. 0) Pre-requisite: CS 301

Overview of data communication in today’s business environment. Topics covered include: data communications and telecommunications, OSI reference model, TCP/IP protocol stack, LAN and WAN architectures, Internet technologies, role of ISPs, voice oriented networks, mobile computing, digital and analogue transmissions, distributed systems, frame relay networks, backbone network management systems, and network and internetwork security management.

 

CSC 410 I.T.Research Methodology & Project Management (3 Units)

(L:30 P45) Pre-requisite CSC 306

Definition and explanation of terms, Literature review, methodology, computing research resources, Research document and communication, Time management, managing your supervisor, research regulations and Ethics. Technical Writing and Reporting.Team Management, Project Scheduling, Software measurement and estimation techniques, Risk analysis, Software quality assurance, Software Configuration Management, Project Management tools.

 

CSC 411-Compiler Construction II (2 Units)

(L. 30: P. 0: T. 0) Pre-requisite: CS 304

Grammars and languages; recognizers, top-down and bottom-up; production languages; Run-time storage organisation; The use of display in run-time storage allocation; LR grammars and analysis, construction of LR table. Organisation of symbol tables.Allocation of storage to run-time variables. Code generation, optimization, translator writing systems.

 

CSC 412-Structured Programming (2 Units)

(L. 30: P. 0: T. 0) Pre-requisite: CS 201 & CS 202

Principles of good programming style, expression; structured programming concepts, control flow, invariant relation of a loop; stepwise refinement of both statement and data; program modularization (Bottom-up approach, top-down approach, nested virtual machine approach); languages for structured programming, debugging, testing, verifying, code inspection, semantic analysis. Test construction. Program verification; test generation and running.

 

CSC 415- Net-Centric Computing(3 Units)

(L. 45: P. 0: T. 0) Pre-requisite: CS 202 & CS 309

Distributed Computing, Mobile & Wireless Computing, Network Security; Client/Server Computing (using the web), Building Web Applications

 

CSC 416- Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) (2 Units)

(L. 30: P. 0: T. 0) Pre-requisite:

Fundamentals of HCI, Principles of GUI, GUI Toolkits; Human-centered software evaluation and development; GUI design and programming

 

CSC 414 – Project (6 Units)

Students embark on a work that will lead to a substantial software and or prototype development under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

 

CSC 417 Distributed Computing Systems(3 Units)

(L:30 P:45)Pre-requisite CSC 204 & CSC 303

Introduction: Definitions, Motivation; Communication Mechanisms: Communication Protocols, RPC, RMI, Stream-Oriented Communication; Synchronization: Global State, Election, Distributed Mutual Exclusion, Distributed Transactions; Naming: Generic Schemes, DNS, Naming and Localization; Replication and Coherence: Consistency Models And Protocols; Fault Tolerance: Group Communication, Two-And Three-Phase Commit, Checkpointing; Security: Access Control, Key Management, Cryptography; Distributed File Systems: NFS, Coda etc.

 

CSC 418 Special Topics in Computer Science (3 Units)

(L:30 P:45)

Special topics from any area of computer science considered relevant at given time. Topics are expected to change from year to year. Apart from seminars to be given by lecturers and guests, students are expected to do substantial readings on their own.

Chemistry Course Description for All Students

100 Level

CHM 101 Physical Chemistry I (3 Units)

Kinetic theory of gases; science of real gases; the laws of thermodynamics; entropy and free energy; reactions and phase equilibria; reaction rates; rate laws; mechanism and theories of elementary processes; photochemical reactions; basic electrochemistry

           

CHM 103 Practical Physical Chemistry (1 Unit)

All practical work related to curricula covered in CHM 101: Kinetic theory of gases; science of real gases; the laws of thermodynamics; entropy and free energy; reactions and phase equilibria; reaction rates; rate laws; mechanism and theories of elementary processes; photochemical reactions; basic electrochemistry

 

Biology Course Description for All Students

100 Level

BIO 101: General Biology I (3 Units)

Origin of life and influence of living things on the chemistry of the Earth.Essentials of life, including sources and use of energy, responsiveness to natural selection and cellularity. Cell structure and organization, functions of cellular organelles, diversity, characteristics and classification of living things, general reproduction, interrelationship of organisms; heredity and evolution, elements of ecology and types of habitat. 

Mathematics Course Description For All Students

100 Level

MTH 101: Elementary Mathematics I-Algebra and Trigonometry (3 Units)

Elementary set theory; subset, union, intercept, complements, Venn diagram. Real numbers; integers, rational numbers, mathematical induction, real sequences and series, theory of quadratic equations, binomial theorem. Complex numbers, algebra of complex numbers; the Argand diagram. De Moivre’s theorem; nth roots of unity; circular measures; trigonometric functions of angles and magnitude, addition and factor formulae. Indices and logarithms, matrices and determinants partial fractions.

 

MTH 102: Elementary M0athematics II –Vectors, Geometry and Dynamics (3 Units) Geometric representation of vectors in 1-3 dimensions, components, direction cosines. Addition and scalar, Multiplication of vectors.Differentiation and integration of vectors with respect to a scalar variable.Two-dimensional coordinate geometry.Straight lines, circles, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, tangents, normal.Kinematics of a particle.Components of velocity and acceleration of a particle moving in a plane. Force, momentum, laws of motion under gravity, projectiles, resisted vertical motion, elastic string, simple pendulum impulse, impact of two smooth-spheres and of a sphere on a smooth sphere. Vector equations, lines and planes.

 

MTH 103:  Elementary Mathematics III-Calculus (2 Units)

Pre-requisite: MTH 101

Function of a real variable, graphs, limits, and idea of continuity. The derivative as limit or rate of change.Techniques of differentiation.Extreme curve sketching.Integration as an inverse of differentiation.Methods of integration, definite integrals.Application to areas, volumes applications to moments of inertia and lengths of arcs.

 

200Level

 

MTH 201: Mathematical Methods (3 Units)

Pre-requisite: MTH 103.

Real-valued function of a real variable. Review of differentiation and integration and their applications. Mean value theorem. Taylor series. Real-valued functions of two or three variables. Partial derivatives, chain rule, extreme, languages multipliers. Increments, differentials and linear approximations.Evaluation line integral and linear integral.

 

MTH 202: Elementary Differential Equations (3 Units)

Pre-requisite: MTH 103

Derivation of differential equations from primitive, geometry, physics etc. order and degree of differential equation. Techniques for solving first and second order linear and non-linear equations.  Solutions of systems of first order linear equations.  Finite linear difference equations.Application to geometry and physics.

 

MTH 203:  Sets, Logic and Algebra I (3 Units)

Pre-requisite: MTH 101

Introduction to the language and concepts of modern Mathematics. Topics include; Basic set theory: mappings, relations, equivalence and other relations, cartesian products. Binary logic, methods of proof.Binary operations. Algebraic structures, semi-groups, rings, integral domains fields.  Homeomorphics.Number systems; properties of integers, rational, real and complex numbers.

 

MTH 204: Linear Algebra I (2 Units)

Pre-requisite: MTH 101

Vector space over the real field.Subspaces, linear independence, basis and dimension. Linear transformations and their representation by matrices – range, null space, rank. Singular and non-singular  transformation and matrices. Algebra of matrices.

 

MTH 205: Linear Algebra II (2 Units) 

Pre-requisite: MTH 101 

Systems of linear equation change of basis, equivalence and similarity. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors.Minimum  and characteristic polynomials of a linear transformation (Matrix). Cayley –Hamilton  theorem. Bilinear and quadratic forms, orthogonal diagonalisation. Canonical forms. 

 

MTH 209: Introduction to Numerical Analysis (3 Units) 

Pre-requisite: MTH 101 & 103

Solution of algebraic and transcendental equations. Curve fitting. Error analysis.Interpolation and approximation.Zeros or non- linear equations ‘to one variable’.Systems of linear equations.Numerical differentiation and integral equations.Initial value problems for ordinary differential equation.

 

300 Level

 

MTH 309: Discreet Mathematics (4 Units)  

Pre- requisites: MTH 203 & 204.

Groups and subgroups; Group Axioms, Permutation Group, Cosets, Graphs; Directed and undirected graphs, subgraphs, cycles, connectivity, Application (flow Charts) and state transitiongraphs; lattices and Boolean Algebra, Finite fields: Minipoly-nomials. Irreducible polynomials,poly-nomial roots, Application (error-correcting codes, sequences generators).

 

MTH 316: Introduction to Operation Research (3 Units)

Pre- requisites: MTH 204 & 205.

Phases of operation Research Study.Classification of operation Research models, linear; Dynamic and integer programming.DecisionTheory.Inventory Models, Critical Path Analysis and Project Controls.

 

MTH 318: Numerical Analysis I (3 Units)  

Pre- requisite: MTH 209

Polynomial and splines approximation.Orthogonal polynomials and Chebyshev approximations.Direct and interactive methods for the solution of systems of linear equations.Eigenvalue problem – power methods, inverse power methods.Pivoting strategies.

 

 

400 Level

 

MTH 427:  Numerical Analysis II (3 Units)

Pre-requisite: MTH 318

Finite difference equation and operations; Discrete variable methods for solution of IUPS – ODES.Discrete and continuous Tan methods for solving IUP – ODES, error analysis.Partial differential equation.Finite difference and finite element methods.Stability convergence and error analyses.

 

Physics Course Description For All Students

100 Level

PHY 101: General Physics I - Mechanics (3 Units)

Linear motion, motion in a circle and Simple Harmonic Motion.Gravitation, Statics and hydrostatics, elasticity, friction, viscosity and surface tension.Heat, temperature, thermometers.Expansion of solids, liquid and gases. The gas laws, change of state, kinetic theory of matter. Heat transfer.

 

PHY 102: General Physics II -Electricity and Magnetism (3 Units)

Electrostatics, conductors and currents: dielectric: Magnetic fields and induction; Maxwell’s equation: Electromagnetic oscillations and waves applications

 

200 Level

PHY 202: Introduction to Electric Circuits and Electronics  (3 Units)

D.C. Circuits; Kirchhoff’s Laws, sources of end and current, network analysis and circuit theorems.A.C.Circuits. Inductance, capacitance, the transformer, sinusoidal wave-forms runs and peak values, power, impedance and admittance series RLC circuit, Q factor, resonance, Network analysis and circuit theorems, filters. Electronics; semiconductors, the PN-junction, Amplification and the transistor; field effect transistors, bipolar transistors, Characteristics and equivalent circuits, amplifiers, feedback, oscillators; signal generators. There should be alternate week laboratory work.

 

PHY 241: Electromagnetism (3 Units) 

Pre-requisite: PHY 201

Electrostatics and magnetostatics.Laplace's equation and boundary value problems; Multiple expansions, dielectric and magnetic materials.Faraday'slaw.A.C. Circuits.Maxwell's equations. Lorentz  covariance and special relativity; Gauss theorem in dielectrics, Poisson’s equations; Uniqueness’ theorem; magnetron; magnetic properties; motors; Generators and Poynting vectors. 

 

Statistics Course Description for all Students                    

100 Level

STA 203: Statistics for Physical Sciences and Engineering (4 Units)

Scope for statistical methods in physical sciences and engineering.Measures of location, partition and dispersion.Elements of probability. Probability distribution: binomial Poisson, geometric, hypergeometric, negativebinomial, normal Poisson, geometric, hypergeometric, negative binomial, normal, Student’s t and chi-square distributions. Estimation (point and internal) and tests of hypotheses concerning population means proportions and variances. Regression and correlation.Non-parametric tests.Contingency table analysis.Introduction to design of experiments.Analysis of variance.

 

STA 111:Probability 1 (4 Units)

Permutation and combination.Concepts and principles of probability.Randomvariables.Probability and distribution functions.Basic  distributions: Binomial, geometric, Poisson,  normal and sampling distributions; exploratory data analysis. 

 

200 Level

STA 211: Probability II (4 Units) Further permutation and combination. Probability laws.Conditional probability. Independence. Bayes’ theorem. Probability distribution of discrete and continuous random variables: binomial, Poisson, geometric, hypergeometric, rectangular  (uniform), negative exponential, binomial. Expectations and moments of random variables.Chebyshev’sinequality.Joint marginal and conditional distributions and moments.Limitingdistributions.Discrete and continuous random variables, standard distributions, moments and momentgenerating functions, laws of large numbers and the central limit theorem.

 

General Studies (GST) Course Description for all Students

100 Level

GST 101 - Use of English and Library (4 Units)

Part I: Use of Library

Brief History of Libraries, Library and Education, University Libraries and Other Types of Libraries, Study Skills (reference services), Types of Materials, Using Library Resources, Understanding Library Catalogues and Classification, Copyright and Its Implications, Database Resources, Bibliography Citations and Referencing

Part II :  Use of English

Effective communication and writing in English Language, Writing of Different Essays and Letters, Reading Comprehension, Lexis and Structure of English Language, The art of Listening, Note making and Note taking, Public Speaking and Oral Communication, Phonetics, Summary and Report Writing

 

GST102 - Philosophy and Logic (2 Units)

Notions, Branches and Problems of philosophy, Special Symbols in Symbolic logic, Logical Constants, Conjunction, Affirmation, Negation, Distribution, Equivalence and conditional statements, Laws of  thought, The method of  deduction using rules of inference   and bi-conditionals quantification theory, Philosophical Foundations of Human Existence, Basic Notions in Social and Political Philosophy, Concept and Authority of Power

 

GST103 - Nigeria Peoples and Culture (2 Units)

Nigeria history and culture in pre-colonial times, Nigerian perception of his world, Cultural Heritage of Nigerians and their Characteristics, Evolution of Nigeria as a Political Unit, Concept of Functional Education, National Economy, Balance of Trade, Economic Self-Reliance, Social Justice, Individual and National Development, Norms and Values, Moral Obligations of the Citizens, Environmental sanitation

 

GST 104 - History and Philosophy Of Science (2 Units)

Man, His Origin and Nature, Man and His Cosmic Environment, Science and Technology in the Society, Environmental effect of chemicals, plastics, textiles, and other materials, Chemical and radio-chemical hazards, Introduction to the various areas of science and technology, Health and Hygienic habits for survival, Computer Science and Technology, STD, HIV/AIDS and Community Health.

 

200 Level

 

GST 222: Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution (2 Units)

Basic Concepts in peace studies and conflict resolution, Peace as vehicle of unity and development, Conflict issues, Types of conflict, e. g. Ethnic/religious/political/economic conflicts, Root causes of conflicts and violence in Africa, Indigene/settler phenomenon, Peace-building, Management of conflict and security. Elements of peace studies and conflict resolution, Developing a culture of peace, Peace mediation and peace-keeping, Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR). Dialogue/arbitration in conflict resolution, Role of international organizations in conflict resolution, e.g. ECOWAS, African Union, United Nations, etc.


GST 223: Introduction to Entrepreneurial Skills (2 Units)

Introduction to entrepreneurship and new venture creation; Entrepreneurship in theory and practice; The opportunity, Forms of business, Staffing, Marketing and the new venture; Determining capital requirements, Raising capital; Financial planning and management; Starting a new business, Feasibility studies; Innovation; Legal Issues; Insurance and environmental considerations. Possible business opportunities in Nigeria.